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The Book of Trees
Lectures by author Manuel Lima

April 24 at 7pm
Strand Books, New York
Free with purchase of the book or Strand giftcard

May 21 at noon
92nd Street Y, New York
Tickets: $21, available here

The Book of Trees: Visualizing Branches of Knowledge is available now from Princeton Architectural Press!

The love letters continue! Stephen Powers is painting his love letter to Tokyo. Photos courtesy of Stephen Powers, Marc Jacobs, and lalala.

Stephen Powers’ book, A Love Letter to the Cityand his notecard set, 
I Paid the Light Bill Just to See Your Faceare available now.

Need gift ideas for Easter?

PAPress has you covered with fun and useful stationery items: 
Bird Watching Journal
Nested Notes Stickies
Nests & Eggs Notecards

Type on Screen:
A Critical Guide for Designers, Writers, Developers, and Students

Edited by Ellen Lupton
Available May 27

Reserve a copy from PAPress now!
Shop locally
Pre-order from Amazon

HAPPY BIRTHDAY ANNE LAMOTT!
Anne Lamott is an acclaimed novelist and non-fiction writer, as well as a passionate political activist, public speaker, and writing teacher. But, it’s her tireless support of public libraries that we would like to spotlight and celebrate today. In that spirit, we are proud to present Anne’s moving contribution to our just released book The Public Library: A Photographic Essay.
Steinbeck Country
In Salinas, word went out. This is how many tribal stories begin: word goes out to the people of a community that there is a great danger or that a wrong is being committed. This is how I first found out that the governor planned to close the public libraries in Salinas, making it the largest city in the United States to lose its libraries because of budget cuts.
 Without getting into any mudslinging about whether or not our leaders are clueless, bullying, nonreading numbskulls,let me just say that when word went out that the three libraries—the John Steinbeck, the Cesar Chavez, and El Gabilan—were scheduled for closing, a whole lot of people rose up as one to say, This does not work for us. Salinas is one of the poorest communities in the state of California, in one of the richest counties in the country. The city and the surrounding area serve as the setting for so many of Steinbeck’s great novels. Think farmworkers, fields of artichokes and garlic, faded stucco houses stained with dirt, tracts of ticky-tacky housing, James Dean’s face in East of Eden, strawberry fields, and old gas stations.
 Now think about closing the libraries there, closing the buildings that hold the town’s books, all those stories about people and wisdom and justice and life and silliness and laborers bending low to pick the strawberries. You’d have to be crazy to bring such obvious karmic repercussions down on yourself. So in early April, a group of writers and actors fought back, showing up in Salinas for a twenty-four-hour “emergency read-in.”
[[MORE]]
My sad sixties heart soared like an eagle at contemplating the very name: emergency read-in. George W. Bush and John Ashcroft had tried for years to create a country the East German state could only dream about, empowering the government to keep track of the books we checked out or bought, all in the name of national security. But the president and the attorney general hadn’t counted on how passionately writers and readers feel about the world, or at any rate, the worlds contained inside the silent spines of books.
 We came together because we started out as children who were saved by stories, stories read to us at night when we were little, stories we read by ourselves, in which we could get lost and thereby found. Some of us had grown up to become people with loud voices, which the farmworkers and their children needed. And we were mad. Show a bunch of writers a free public library is a revolutionary notion, and when people don’t have free access to books, then communities are like radios without batteries. You cut people off from essential sources of information—mythical, practical, linguistic, political—and you break them. You render them helpless in the face of political oppression. We were not going to let this happen.
 Writers and actors came from San Francisco and San Jose, from all around. Maxine Hong Kingston came from Oakland. Hector Elizondo drove up from Los Angeles, as did Mike Farrell. The poet José Montoya drove from Sacramento, four hours away. Alisa Valdes-Rodriguez flew all morning to be there. I drove down from the Bay Area with the Buddhist writer and teacher Jack Kornfield.
When we arrived, the lawn outside the Chavez library held only about 150 people—not the throngs we had hoped for—but the community was especially welcoming and grateful, and the women of CODEPINK, who helped organize the event, kept everyone’s spirits up. It’s hard to be depressed when activists in pink feather boas are kissing you. Many people had pitched tents on one side of the library, where they could rest through the night while the readings were proceeding onstage. 
 Can you imagine the kind of person who is willing to stay up all night in the cold to keep a few condemned libraries open? Well, not me, baby.
 I was going home to my own bed that night. But then I saw some of my parents’ old friends who were planning to stay, people who have been protesting and rallying in civil rights and peace marches since I was a girl, people who had driven from San Francisco because they’ve always know that the only thing that keeps a democracy functioning is the constant education of its citizens. If you don’t have a place where the poor, the marginalized, and the young can find out who they are, then you have no hope of maintaining a free and civilized society.
 We were there to celebrate some of the rare intelligence capabilities that our country can actually be proud of—those of librarians. I see them as healers and magicians. Librarians can tease out of inarticulate individuals enough information about what they are after to lead them on the path of connection. They are trail guides through the forest of shelves and aisles—you turn a person loose who has limited skills, and he’ll be walloped by the branches. But librarians match up readers with the right books: “Hey, is this one too complicated? They why don’t you give this one a try?”
 Inside the library were Hispanic children and teenagers and their parents, and a few old souls. They sat in chairs reading, stood surveying the bilingual collection, and worked at the computers. These computers are the only ones that a lot of people in town have access to. The afterschool literacy and homework programs at the libraries are among the few safe places where parents can direct their children, away from the gangs.
 On this afternoon, parents read to their children in whispered Spanish, and the air felt nutritious. As Barry Lopez once said, “Sometimes a person needs a story more than food to stay alive.”
 I went back outside. Poets of every color were reading. People milled around with antiwar placards—“¡Libros si!¡Bombas no!” Older members of the community told stories from legends, history, their own families. Fernando Suarez stepped up to the mike and spoke of his nineteen year-old son, who had died not long before in Iraq. Suarez spoke first in English and then in Spanish, as he does frequently around the country, and your heart could hardly beat for the sadness.
 Maybe in Oaxaca children are still hearing stories that the elders tell, but these kids in Salinas are being raised by television sets: they are latchkey kids. Their parents work for the most part in the fields and in wealthy homes. If you are mesmerized by television stupidity, and don’t get to hear or read stories about your world, you can be fooled into thinking that the world isn’t miraculous—and it is.
 The media attention brought in enough money, partly as a result of that day, to keep the libraries open for a whole year. You might not call this a miracle, exactly, but if you had been at the emergency read-in, you would see that it was at least the beginning of one.
A bunch of normally self-obsessed artist types came together to say to the people of Salinas: We care about your children, your stories, and your freedom. Something has gone so wrong in this country that needs to be fixed, and we care about that. Reading and books are medicine. Stories are written and told by and for people who have been broken, but who have risen up, or will rise, if attention is paid to them. Those people are you and us. Stories and truth are splints for the soul, and that makes today a sacred gathering. Now we were all saying: Pass it on.
[Pictured] John Steinbeck Library, Salinas, California, 2009

HAPPY BIRTHDAY ANNE LAMOTT!

Anne Lamott is an acclaimed novelist and non-fiction writer, as well as a passionate political activist, public speaker, and writing teacher. But, it’s her tireless support of public libraries that we would like to spotlight and celebrate today. In that spirit, we are proud to present Anne’s moving contribution to our just released book The Public Library: A Photographic Essay.

Steinbeck Country

In Salinas, word went out. This is how many tribal stories begin: word goes out to the people of a community that there is a great danger or that a wrong is being committed. This is how I first found out that the governor planned to close the public libraries in Salinas, making it the largest city in the United States to lose its libraries because of budget cuts.

Without getting into any mudslinging about whether or not our leaders are clueless, bullying, nonreading numbskulls,let me just say that when word went out that the three libraries—the John Steinbeck, the Cesar Chavez, and El Gabilan—were scheduled for closing, a whole lot of people rose up as one to say, This does not work for us. Salinas is one of the poorest communities in the state of California, in one of the richest counties in the country. The city and the surrounding area serve as the setting for so many of Steinbeck’s great novels. Think farmworkers, fields of artichokes and garlic, faded stucco houses stained with dirt, tracts of ticky-tacky housing, James Dean’s face in East of Eden, strawberry fields, and old gas stations.

Now think about closing the libraries there, closing the buildings that hold the town’s books, all those stories about people and wisdom and justice and life and silliness and laborers bending low to pick the strawberries. You’d have to be crazy to bring such obvious karmic repercussions down on yourself. So in early April, a group of writers and actors fought back, showing up in Salinas for a twenty-four-hour “emergency read-in.”

How well do you know the inner-workings of your bicycle?

The Bike Deconstructed: A Grand Tour of the Modern Bicycle by Richard Hallett is available now.

April is National Landscape Architecture Month!

It’s also the month that The American Society of Landscape Architects New York announces the winners of their Annual Design Awards. We are thrilled to report that this year’s winners include James Corner Field Operations.

On May 20th, we will publish The Landscape Imagination: Collected Essays of James Corner 1990–2010. In his follow up to the acclaimed Recovering Landscape, Corner discusses two decades of projects, including Tongva Park & Ken Gensler Square, the High Line and Fresh Kills Park in NYC, University of Puerto Rico Botanical Garden in Puerto Rico, Qianhai Water City in China, and competition entries for parks in Helsinki, and Toronto.

Know where to find some Guastavino tile work? Take a photo and upload it to PalacesForThePeople.com, and don’t forget to tweet it with the #Guastavino hashtag! Through Sept. 7, The Museum of the City of New York is holding an exhibition on Rafael Guastavino called Palaces for the People: Guastavino and the Art of Structural Tile, curated by G. Martin Moeller Jr. and John Ochsendorf, and you can help uncover Guastavino’s spaces!

For more information on the work of Guastavino, pick up a copy of Ochsendorf’s book, Guastavino Vaulting: The Art of Structural Tile, and check out this article in the New York Review of Books!

Discussion - free and open to the public
April 11, noon-2 p.m.
Butler Library, Room 523, Columbia University

Guastavino’s Palaces for the People: from archive to exhibition

The speakers will discuss the history of the Guastavino archive, from its last-minute discovery and rescue by Columbia University professor George R. Collins to the creation and design of the exhibition, Palaces for the People. 

• John Ochsendorf, MIT: 
The Guastavino Company and the exhibition, Palaces for the People

• Janet Parks, Avery Library, Columbia University: 
The Guastavino Archive: from acquisition to exhibition

• Chysanthe Broikos, National Building Museum: 
Nature of Architectural Exhibitions

• Daniel Fouad, C&G Design: 
Designing for architectural exhibition

We join an international chorus of well wishers when we say congratulations to Shigeru Ban for his much-deserved 2014 Pritzker Architecture Prize.

A very revealing interview with the architect appears in our 2011 book of conversations with leading Japanese architects and designers Matter in the Floating World.

Here is just one gem from the discussion:

"I believe the strength of a material has nothing to do with the strength of a building. Even a paper tube structure can be made to withstand an earthquake that a concrete building cannot outlive."

Happy Birthday Mies van der Rohe!

He was born on this day in 1886. From our own Conversations with Mies van der Rohe are his Lake Shore Drive apartment buildings under construction in Chicago and the master himself staring out through a just completed window. 

Thanks to everyone who came out to Strand Books last night. We sure packed the place! To celebrate the completion of the 5-panel mural on the 12th Street wall of the Strand, Stephen Powers chatted with Ego Trip magazine’s Sacha Jenkins about Powers’ beginnings as a graffiti writer, magazines, community art around the world, and other artists. Afterward, Powers signed copies of A Love Letter to the CityThen a bunch of us at PAPress went on a basement scavenger hunt in search of Stephen Powers’ little paintings hiding between the stacks. Have you found them all yet?

Outtakes from The Greenest Home Exhibition
RISD, BEB Gallery, Providence, RI
March 17 through April 3, 2014

The exhibition will include thermal images from The Greenest Home and student photos of local architecture through an IR camera, map of Belgium at a country-wide scale with vast amounts of Passive House projects, The Greenest Home page spreads on display, three project models, and much more!

Panel Discussion, RISD Architecture Spring Lecture Series
RISD, BEB Gallery, Room 106, Providence, RI
March 17 at 6:30 p.m.

Julie Torres Moskovitz, Fabrica718 (author and moderator)
Laura Briggs, BriggsKnowles A + D
Jordan Goldman, ZeroEnergy Design
Bill Ryall, Ryall Porter Sheridan Architects
David White, Right Environments 

The Greenest Home: Superinsulated and Passive House Design is written by Julie Torres Moskovitz and published by
Princeton Architectural Press.

Find Perfetto Pencils near you!
AlabamaBehind the Glass
Alaska Purple Ravin Inc
ArizonaIntergalactic Inc
California - NorthBooks Inc, NBC Stationery & Gift, Nest, The Gardener, Last Gasp of San Fran, Mrs. Dalloway’s, Gallery Bookstop, Point Reyes Books, Haight Booksmith, Keplers 2020 FPC, Builders Booksource, Xapno, Bay Co Books Inc, Crocker Art Museum, Just for Fun, Thidwick Books, Lola of North Beach, Leigh’s Favorite Books, Gigi & Rose, Sallie Mac, Linden Tree, Heartfelt, Coastside Books, GG’s Simple Luxuries, Palace Art and Office, University Art Center, Russian Hill Books, Northtown Books, Face in a Book
California - SouthLA County Museum of Art, Urbanic, Associated Students/UCLA, Diesel Bookstore, Marz Gallery & Gifts, Upstairs/Pierre La Fond, Seed Peoples Market, New Stone Age, Firefly Inc, Soho, Seaside Papery, Eikon Home, Skylight Books, Yolk, Lundeen’s, Trinkets & Treasures, Kinokuniya Book Stores, Chaucer’s Bookstore, The Quill, Oh Hello Friend, Marie et Cie Inc, 
ColoradoThe Tattered Cover, Comfortable Home, Poor Richard’s Bookstore
ConnecticutU Conn Co-op, Breakwater Books, Bank Square Books
FloridaBesame Mucho, Boxelder, Morse Museum of American Art, Macintosh Books & Paper, Classic Bookshop
GeorgiaBooks @ Manic, Richards Variety Store, Roost Gifts & Decor, Merci Beaucoup Boutique
IllinoisDick Blick Company, Book Table, Seminary Coop Bookstore, Lake Forest Book Store, Town House Books, Komoda Inc, Art Coop
IndianaIMA Retail Services, Vons Book Shop
Iowa Prairie Lights Books
KansasWatermark Books
KentuckyCarmichaels Bookstore, Morris Book Shop
LouisianaRed Arrow Workshop
MainePortland Museum of Art, Black Parrot
Maryland Baltimore Museum of Art, Atomic Books
MassachusettsBrookline Booksmith, Harvard Bookstore, ICA Store, Museum of Fine Arts, Odyssey Bookshop, New England Mobile, Porter Square Books, Isabella Stewart Gardner, Wellesley Books, Cantabrigia Remex Inc, Trident Bookstore, On Center, Book Ends
MichiganFound, Papyrus, Middle Earth, paper and i 
MinnesotaCorazon Inc, The Bibelot Shops Inc,
MississippiMississippi Museum
MontanaRed Rooster Trading, Country Bookshelf
NevadaNevada Museum of Art
New HampshireInnisfree Bookshop
New JerseyWatchung Booksellers, Lakes Office Supply
New YorkArea Kids, Word, Posman Books at Grand, Book Culture, Oblong Books & Music, DIA Center for the Arts, A I Friedman, The Library Shop, Spoonbill & Sugartown, Armosphere, Paper Trail, Bookcourt, Bank Street Book Store, Stewart / Stand Design, Parrish Art Museum, Ink Pad, Powerhouse Arena, O.D. Bookstore
North CarolinaParker and Otis, University of North Carolina, Moon and Lola, LAKB Design 
OhioFireside Book Shop, Nonnie Waller’s
Oregon Portland Art Museum, Pomegranate Home/Garden, Oblation Papers & Press, Susan C Mautz Co
PennsylvaniaDetails, Otto Book Store
Rhode IslandBrown University Bookstore, New Port Historical Society
TennesseeReading Rock Books
TexasMercury Design Studio, Brazos Bookstore Inc, Blanton Museum of Art, Contemporary Arts Museum, Hendley Market, Pattywhacks, Paper Place
UtahTabula Rasa, Children’s Hour
VermontNorthshire Bookstore, Northshire Saratoga LLC, Norwich Bookstore, Red Tail Books Inc
VirginiaMongrel, Picket Fence
WashingtonThree Birds, Third Place Company, Annie’s Arts & Frame, Lucca, Bellevue Art Museum, Avenue Arts, Metropolitan Market #156, Queen Anne Book Company, Abracadabra, Island Books Etc
Washington, DCNational Building, Politics & Prose Bookstore
WisconsinWisconsin Historical, Artist & Display, Books & Company
SingaporePost Poetics
South AfricaReal Books
OnlinePrinceton Architectural Press, Amazon, BN.com, Powells

Find Perfetto Pencils near you!

Alabama
Behind the Glass

Alaska 
Purple Ravin Inc

Arizona
Intergalactic Inc

California - North
Books Inc, NBC Stationery & Gift, Nest, The Gardener, Last Gasp of San Fran, Mrs. Dalloway’s, Gallery Bookstop, Point Reyes Books, Haight Booksmith, Keplers 2020 FPC, Builders Booksource, Xapno, Bay Co Books Inc, Crocker Art Museum, Just for Fun, Thidwick Books, Lola of North Beach, Leigh’s Favorite Books, Gigi & Rose, Sallie Mac, Linden Tree, Heartfelt, Coastside Books, GG’s Simple Luxuries, Palace Art and Office, University Art Center, Russian Hill Books, Northtown Books, Face in a Book

California - South
LA County Museum of Art, Urbanic, Associated Students/UCLA, Diesel Bookstore, Marz Gallery & Gifts, Upstairs/Pierre La Fond, Seed Peoples Market, New Stone Age, Firefly Inc, Soho, Seaside Papery, Eikon Home, Skylight Books, Yolk, Lundeen’s, Trinkets & Treasures, Kinokuniya Book Stores, Chaucer’s Bookstore, The Quill, Oh Hello Friend, Marie et Cie Inc, 

Colorado
The Tattered Cover, Comfortable Home, Poor Richard’s Bookstore

Connecticut
U Conn Co-op, Breakwater Books, Bank Square Books

Florida
Besame Mucho, Boxelder, Morse Museum of American Art, Macintosh Books & Paper, Classic Bookshop

Georgia
Books @ Manic, Richards Variety Store, Roost Gifts & Decor, Merci Beaucoup Boutique

Illinois
Dick Blick Company, Book Table, Seminary Coop Bookstore, Lake Forest Book Store, Town House Books, Komoda Inc, Art Coop

Indiana
IMA Retail Services, Vons Book Shop

Iowa 
Prairie Lights Books

Kansas
Watermark Books

Kentucky
Carmichaels Bookstore, Morris Book Shop

Louisiana
Red Arrow Workshop

Maine
Portland Museum of Art, Black Parrot

Maryland 
Baltimore Museum of Art, Atomic Books

Massachusetts
Brookline Booksmith, Harvard Bookstore, ICA Store, Museum of Fine Arts, Odyssey Bookshop, New England Mobile, Porter Square Books, Isabella Stewart Gardner, Wellesley Books, Cantabrigia Remex Inc, Trident Bookstore, On Center, Book Ends

Michigan
Found, Papyrus, Middle Earth, paper and i 

Minnesota
Corazon Inc, The Bibelot Shops Inc,

Mississippi
Mississippi Museum

Montana
Red Rooster Trading, Country Bookshelf

Nevada
Nevada Museum of Art

New Hampshire
Innisfree Bookshop

New Jersey
Watchung Booksellers, Lakes Office Supply

New York
Area Kids, Word, Posman Books at Grand, Book Culture, Oblong Books & Music, DIA Center for the Arts, A I Friedman, The Library Shop, Spoonbill & Sugartown, Armosphere, Paper Trail, Bookcourt, Bank Street Book Store, Stewart / Stand Design, Parrish Art Museum, Ink Pad, Powerhouse Arena, O.D. Bookstore

North Carolina
Parker and Otis, University of North Carolina, Moon and Lola, LAKB Design 

Ohio
Fireside Book Shop, Nonnie Waller’s

Oregon 
Portland Art Museum, Pomegranate Home/Garden, Oblation Papers & Press, Susan C Mautz Co

Pennsylvania
Details, Otto Book Store

Rhode Island
Brown University Bookstore, New Port Historical Society

Tennessee
Reading Rock Books

Texas
Mercury Design Studio, Brazos Bookstore Inc, Blanton Museum of Art, Contemporary Arts Museum, Hendley Market, Pattywhacks, Paper Place

Utah
Tabula Rasa, Children’s Hour

Vermont
Northshire Bookstore, Northshire Saratoga LLC, Norwich Bookstore, Red Tail Books Inc

Virginia
Mongrel, Picket Fence

Washington
Three Birds, Third Place Company, Annie’s Arts & Frame, Lucca, Bellevue Art Museum, Avenue Arts, Metropolitan Market #156, Queen Anne Book Company, Abracadabra, Island Books Etc

Washington, DC
National Building, Politics & Prose Bookstore

Wisconsin
Wisconsin Historical, Artist & Display, Books & Company

Singapore
Post Poetics

South Africa
Real Books

Online
Princeton Architectural PressAmazonBN.com, Powells

New York City: A love letter to The Strand

Stephen Powers, author of A Love Letter to the City, will be painting a “love letter to the indie bookstore” mural on the 12th Street exterior wall of The Strand Bookstore in New York City on March 18th. Stop by during the day and watch the process. All are welcome at the launch party on March 25th in the Strand’s rare book room!

Mural Painting Begins
Tuesday, March 18
The Strand Bookstore

Book Launch Party
Tuesday, March 25 at 7pm
The Strand Bookstore

A Love Letter to the City is available now. Also check out I Paid the Light Bill Just to See Your Face notecards. Photos above are of Stephen Powers painting inside the Strand in February 2014, courtesy of Emily Simpson.

Sea Ranch Events — California and Texas

Illustrated presentation by Donlyn Lyndon and Tito Patri
Moderated by Alex Bergtraun
Artefact Salvage & Design, Sonoma, CA
Thursday, March 13th, 5:30 pm
$20 / person
Wine reception and book signing to follow the presentation

Presentation by Donlyn Lyndon
Charles Moore Foundation, Austin, TX
Saturday, March 8th, 10 am – noon
Must RSVP to director@charlesmoore.org
$80 / individual (1 book, coffee, lunch)
$95 / couples (1 book, coffee, lunch)
$15 / students (coffee, lunch)