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Words and lettering by Oz Cooper, from a booklet On Old Style and Modern Types (1927). Taken from baseline magazine, issue 22, 1996.

Words and lettering by Oz Cooper, from a booklet On Old Style and Modern Types (1927). Taken from baseline magazine, issue 22, 1996.

75 Artist Books: The Kaldewey Press, New York
A Catalog Raisonné by Clemens von Lucius

In this abundantly illustrated catalogue raisonné, collector and Kaldewey devotee Clemens von Lucius presents in detail all seventy-five books published by the Kaldewey Press since its founding in 1985 by Gunnar A. Kaldewey. 

While few small presses have managed to produce such a large body of work, the Kaldewey Press has earned the reputation as one of the world’s finest publishers of contemporary artist books. 75 Artist Books presents work published in cooperation with artists such as Mischa Kuball, Jonathan Lasker, Heribert C. Ottersbach, Richard Tuttle, and Hans Peter Willberg.

Check out this recent title from Hermann Schmidt Mainz, distributed in North America by Princeton Architectural Press.

One of our favorite comics in You’re All Just Jealous of My Jetpack by Tom Gauld, published this year by Drawn & Quarterly

One of our favorite comics in You’re All Just Jealous of My Jetpack by Tom Gauld, published this year by Drawn & Quarterly

The Masks (2002) by Gregory L. Blackstockfrom Blackstock’s Collections: The Drawings of an Artistic Savant

(see also Notepads for List Makers)

The Masks (2002) by Gregory L. Blackstock
from Blackstock’s Collections: The Drawings of an Artistic Savant

(see also Notepads for List Makers)

Celebrating Le Corbusier’s birthday (October 6) and the onset of autumn in New York

A photo of LC at work, and a drawing he made to diagram the sun’s impact on a building through the seasons. From Le Corbusier and the Maisons Jaoul, published by Princeton Architectural Press.

Highlights from a collection of “typotecture” curated by Dick Sheaff. More typotecture and other ephemera here.

This “Red Cat Typography Pamphlet,” printed in 1992 in Vineburg, California, represents chapter 18 from Theodore Low De Vinne’s Correct Composition. First published in 1901, “Errors of the Press” describes the myriad ways things can (and do) go wrong in the publishing process, from author to bookbinder.

“Errors of the press is a convenient phrase, for it carries with it a vague notion that there is in the methods or machinery of printing a perverse tendency to the making of mistakes which are due more to the process than to the man. What is meant by the press is not clear: it seems to be a factor apart from the man, for it is seldom any helper of the press confesses that ‘the mistake is mine.’ … That no one should be held responsible for some forms of misprint (another convenient phrase) is a comfortable doctrine for the authors, compositors, and proof-readers who work with haste and negligence, for the press is inanimate and cannot respond. The silent are always wrong.”

From the Design Dept. bookshelf. (Fact: the De Vinne Press Building is around the corner from our office.)

Two specimens of large type in a facsimile specimen book, from the PAPress Design Dept bookshelf. A excerpt from the preface by Richard L. Hopkins:

Specimens from the A. W. Kinsley & Company of Albany, New York (1825–1831), are extremely rare and for that reason, have not had a lot of exposure to the fraternity of specimen book aficionados over the years. Prior to the discovery of the specimen used as copy for this facsimile, only three copies were known to exist—shuttered up in institutions. Two copies were at Columbia University, and a third at the California Historical Society. That is why it was especially gratifying to discover another very complete copy of this rare gem in 2000; that’s why a complete facsimile edition was considered necessary.… The quantity of large type is surprising for it is highly unlikely any of this type is wood type—that process was just being developed about this time (1828).

subtilitas:

Miro Rivera - Trail bathroom, Austin TX 2008. 

Featured in the upcoming Materials for Design 2, a revised and expanded update to the popular first volume, featuring all new case studies. Available this winter from PAPress.

subtilitas:

Alberto Campo Baeza - De Blas House, Madrid 2000 (click for big). Via.

Nearly all buildings use reinforced cast-in-place concrete for their foundation material. In this project, the foundation becomes larger, emerging from the earth and accommodating a large part of the program; yet it remains subservient to the superstructure, in this case made of a contrasting system of construction.

This house is featured in Materials for Design for its innovative approach to cast-in-place concrete. Materials for Design 2 will be available from PAPress this winter, with all new case studies in chapters on glass, concrete, wood, metals, plastics, and now masonry. Like the first volume, MFD2 will be full of insightful details on the materiality of the featured buildings, replete with vivid photography and helpful technical drawings.

In 1965 Edward Ruscha published Some Los Angeles Apartments, the third in his ongoing series of photographic books, and completed a group of ten related drawings that depict variations on the ubiquitous Southern California apartment building. This exhibition and publication bring together for the first time the drawings with the book that inspired them, presenting a concise view of Ruscha’s Los Angeles in 1965.
Edward Ruscha: Los Angeles Apartments, published by the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1990, from the PAPress Design Dept bookshelf.

In 1965 Edward Ruscha published Some Los Angeles Apartments, the third in his ongoing series of photographic books, and completed a group of ten related drawings that depict variations on the ubiquitous Southern California apartment building. This exhibition and publication bring together for the first time the drawings with the book that inspired them, presenting a concise view of Ruscha’s Los Angeles in 1965.

Edward Ruscha: Los Angeles Apartments, published by the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1990, from the PAPress Design Dept bookshelf.

Cover and spreads from Notes in Hand, a small book containing Claes Oldenburg’s sketches, with typeset translations of his often indecipherable handwriting. Published by E. P. Dutton in 1971. From the PAPress Design Dept bookshelf.

This monograph was originally published on the occasion of an exhibition of the architecture of Mies van der Rohe held at the Museum of Modern Art, September 16 – November 23, 1947.
A third edition of Mies van der Rohe by Philip Johnson, published in 1978, the same year the author was awarded (as a trustee of MoMA) an AIA Gold Medal. The following year, Johnson received the first Pritzker Prize. This copy is from the PAPress Design Dept bookshelf.

This monograph was originally published on the occasion of an exhibition of the architecture of Mies van der Rohe held at the Museum of Modern Art, September 16 – November 23, 1947.

A third edition of Mies van der Rohe by Philip Johnson, published in 1978, the same year the author was awarded (as a trustee of MoMA) an AIA Gold Medal. The following year, Johnson received the first Pritzker Prize. This copy is from the PAPress Design Dept bookshelf.

dezeen:

Old Market Square Stage by 5468796 Architecture
Photography by James Brittain

The screens are comprised of 20,000 individual aluminum pieces, each cut at a precise angle and strung together with aircraft cable. For performances, the lightweight screens can be lifted by an electric winch to reveal the stage inside. 

Find this innovative use of metal and many other creative material applications in Materials for Design 2, coming soon from PAPress.

But of course modern typography was not the abrupt invention of one man or even of one group. It emerged in response to new demands and new opportunities thrown up by the nineteenth century. The violence with which modern typography burst upon the early twentieth-century scene reflected the violence with which new concepts in art and design in every field were sweeping away exhausted conventions and challenging those attitudes which had no relevance to a highly industrialized society.

Interior pages featuring the work of Piet Zwart (1929), Herbert Bayer (1923), and Jan Tschichold (1929).

From a first edition of Pioneers of Modern Typography by Herbert Spencer, published in 1969 by Lund Humphries, London. Pulled from the PAPress Design Dept. bookshelf.