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Malo from 1973-1980 Larry from 1974-1981

From Terminal Bar by Sheldon Nadelman and Stefan Nadelman, available October 2014. Reserve a copy here!

left: Malo from 1973–1981
- - -
right: Larry from 1974–1981
"Larry lived on the Lower East Side. He drank beer."

Book Talk and Signing with John Comazzi
Tuesday, June 24 at 5:30pm
The Cliff Dwellers Club, Chicago

In conjunction with the new exhibit Inflected Modernism: The Architecture Photography of Balthazar Korab, John Comazzi will be speaking at the Cliff Dwellers Club. He will sign copies of Balthazar Korab: Architect of Photography. This event is free and open to the public.

Day 2 at Book Expo was all about our upcoming Sept. book PetCam. We raffled off a camera, while special guest shutterbug Stella snapped her own PetCam photos of his adoring fans. Having charmed even the most weary book lovers, Stella slipped out of the booth on assignment before a cat known to get a little Grumpy made the scene!

Over the course of 18 years, Robert Dawson has photographed hundreds of public libraries across the United States, from the monumental to the modest. Check out more portraits of the vibrant but threatened American institution in The Public Library: A Photographic Essay.

winkbooks:

BEE — An artist looks at the honeybee through the lens of an electron microscope.

Work on BEE, the handsome and inspiring book by artist and photographer Rose-Lynn Fisher, began the first time she peered at the magnified image of a bee’s eye and realized that its 6,900 hexagonal lenses looked shockingly similar to a honeycomb. Was this a coincidence or a clue, she wondered? Was there a deeper connection between the structure of a bee’s vision and the structures that it builds (“corresponding frequencies expressed in corresponding forms,” as Fisher puts it)? This set her off on a quest which resulted in this award-winning book (2010 International Photography Awards).

More info on Winkbooks. Get the book here or here.

explore-blog:

Polaroid inventor Edwin Land, the Steve Jobs of his day, was born on this day in 1909 – here are some timeless lessons in ingenuity and innovation from the story of Polaroid

Happy Birthday Dr. Land! Read more in Instant: The Story of Polaroid.

explore-blog:

Polaroid inventor Edwin Land, the Steve Jobs of his day, was born on this day in 1909 – here are some timeless lessons in ingenuity and innovation from the story of Polaroid

Happy Birthday Dr. Land! Read more in Instant: The Story of Polaroid.

Presentation
Publish Your Photography Book 

Wednesday, May 7 at 6:00 p.m.
New York Public Library
5th Avenue at 42nd Street in the Berger Forum

Please join us for a presentation by Darius D. Himes and Mary Virginia Swanson.

Thursday, May 15 at 6:30pm
Annenberg Space for Photography
Los Angeles, CA

Please join us for a presentation by Mary Virginia Swanson.

Publish Your Photography Book, Revised and Updated

How the Cover Evolved

The following is an excerpt of a blog post by Darius Himes, co-author of Publish Your Photography Book, which was recently updated and revised. Please visit the book’s website for the full post.

The first preliminary sketches for the cover design happened very early in the process, and were done in response to the need for something to go in the Princeton Architectural Press Spring 2011 catalog. Of course, that was being printed in summer of 2010, if I remember correctly. Mary Virginia and I were deep in the process of writing the book, and a few ideas got tossed about. We sent these off to Princeton Architectural Press, who used the 3rd one (below) in the catalog, but we felt like we needed to keep pushing the idea. (That’s how this 3rd design ended up on the papress.com website, and on Amazon for awhile.)

image

As Mary Virginia and I got closer to finishing the manuscript, Masumi Shibata and I began the process of photographing the various books that were to be featured. We’d set up a temporary shooting studio in one of the empty rooms in the Skolkin+Chickey offices. It consisted of 2 lights, a roll of paper and a card table. I had my tripod and Masumi brought his camera.

We needed to come up with some visuals for the chapter breaks. We had a stack of bulking dummies around the office from all of the books that were being worked on. (A bulking dummy is an unprinted, bound version of a book, made from the paper and cover materials you’ve decided on. A printer will provide this as a visual; it’s a chance to see the object before you’ve started printing.)

The bulking dummies were in all different sizes and shapes, but completely blank and wrapped in white paper boards and/or white dust jackets. They’re like the Platonic Ideal of a book. I thought we could photograph them in ways that would be perfect for the chapter delineations.

Masumi was the photographer, and I was sort-of the art director for these shoots. At one point I suggested photographing one of the bulking dummies with me holding it. I held it in front of my chest, in my lap, etc. It didn’t quite work. Then I held it off to the side, against the white back-drop. That worked, on some level.

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But wait! How did that become this?

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Read Darius’s full post at publishyourphotographybook.com

Released just in time for National Library Week, our new book The Public Library presents an inspiring selection of libraries both monumental and modest — an impassioned tribute to a vibrant but threatened American institution. 
Above: Interior dome, Central Library, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 2012, photograph by Robert Dawson.

Released just in time for National Library Week, our new book The Public Library presents an inspiring selection of libraries both monumental and modest — an impassioned tribute to a vibrant but threatened American institution. 

Above: Interior dome, Central Library, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 2012, photograph by Robert Dawson.

Robert Dawson (The Public Library) receives Guggenheim Award

The response to our new book The Public Library has been nothing short of ecstatic. We couldn’t be more proud of the book and its author Robert Dawson, who we are thrilled to report, was just awarded a John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship. Dawson was also just interviewed by Scott Simon on NPR Weekend Edition and the book is popping up everywhere.

HAPPY BIRTHDAY ANNE LAMOTT!
Anne Lamott is an acclaimed novelist and non-fiction writer, as well as a passionate political activist, public speaker, and writing teacher. But, it’s her tireless support of public libraries that we would like to spotlight and celebrate today. In that spirit, we are proud to present Anne’s moving contribution to our just released book The Public Library: A Photographic Essay.
Steinbeck Country
In Salinas, word went out. This is how many tribal stories begin: word goes out to the people of a community that there is a great danger or that a wrong is being committed. This is how I first found out that the governor planned to close the public libraries in Salinas, making it the largest city in the United States to lose its libraries because of budget cuts.
 Without getting into any mudslinging about whether or not our leaders are clueless, bullying, nonreading numbskulls,let me just say that when word went out that the three libraries—the John Steinbeck, the Cesar Chavez, and El Gabilan—were scheduled for closing, a whole lot of people rose up as one to say, This does not work for us. Salinas is one of the poorest communities in the state of California, in one of the richest counties in the country. The city and the surrounding area serve as the setting for so many of Steinbeck’s great novels. Think farmworkers, fields of artichokes and garlic, faded stucco houses stained with dirt, tracts of ticky-tacky housing, James Dean’s face in East of Eden, strawberry fields, and old gas stations.
 Now think about closing the libraries there, closing the buildings that hold the town’s books, all those stories about people and wisdom and justice and life and silliness and laborers bending low to pick the strawberries. You’d have to be crazy to bring such obvious karmic repercussions down on yourself. So in early April, a group of writers and actors fought back, showing up in Salinas for a twenty-four-hour “emergency read-in.”
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My sad sixties heart soared like an eagle at contemplating the very name: emergency read-in. George W. Bush and John Ashcroft had tried for years to create a country the East German state could only dream about, empowering the government to keep track of the books we checked out or bought, all in the name of national security. But the president and the attorney general hadn’t counted on how passionately writers and readers feel about the world, or at any rate, the worlds contained inside the silent spines of books.
 We came together because we started out as children who were saved by stories, stories read to us at night when we were little, stories we read by ourselves, in which we could get lost and thereby found. Some of us had grown up to become people with loud voices, which the farmworkers and their children needed. And we were mad. Show a bunch of writers a free public library is a revolutionary notion, and when people don’t have free access to books, then communities are like radios without batteries. You cut people off from essential sources of information—mythical, practical, linguistic, political—and you break them. You render them helpless in the face of political oppression. We were not going to let this happen.
 Writers and actors came from San Francisco and San Jose, from all around. Maxine Hong Kingston came from Oakland. Hector Elizondo drove up from Los Angeles, as did Mike Farrell. The poet José Montoya drove from Sacramento, four hours away. Alisa Valdes-Rodriguez flew all morning to be there. I drove down from the Bay Area with the Buddhist writer and teacher Jack Kornfield.
When we arrived, the lawn outside the Chavez library held only about 150 people—not the throngs we had hoped for—but the community was especially welcoming and grateful, and the women of CODEPINK, who helped organize the event, kept everyone’s spirits up. It’s hard to be depressed when activists in pink feather boas are kissing you. Many people had pitched tents on one side of the library, where they could rest through the night while the readings were proceeding onstage. 
 Can you imagine the kind of person who is willing to stay up all night in the cold to keep a few condemned libraries open? Well, not me, baby.
 I was going home to my own bed that night. But then I saw some of my parents’ old friends who were planning to stay, people who have been protesting and rallying in civil rights and peace marches since I was a girl, people who had driven from San Francisco because they’ve always know that the only thing that keeps a democracy functioning is the constant education of its citizens. If you don’t have a place where the poor, the marginalized, and the young can find out who they are, then you have no hope of maintaining a free and civilized society.
 We were there to celebrate some of the rare intelligence capabilities that our country can actually be proud of—those of librarians. I see them as healers and magicians. Librarians can tease out of inarticulate individuals enough information about what they are after to lead them on the path of connection. They are trail guides through the forest of shelves and aisles—you turn a person loose who has limited skills, and he’ll be walloped by the branches. But librarians match up readers with the right books: “Hey, is this one too complicated? They why don’t you give this one a try?”
 Inside the library were Hispanic children and teenagers and their parents, and a few old souls. They sat in chairs reading, stood surveying the bilingual collection, and worked at the computers. These computers are the only ones that a lot of people in town have access to. The afterschool literacy and homework programs at the libraries are among the few safe places where parents can direct their children, away from the gangs.
 On this afternoon, parents read to their children in whispered Spanish, and the air felt nutritious. As Barry Lopez once said, “Sometimes a person needs a story more than food to stay alive.”
 I went back outside. Poets of every color were reading. People milled around with antiwar placards—“¡Libros si!¡Bombas no!” Older members of the community told stories from legends, history, their own families. Fernando Suarez stepped up to the mike and spoke of his nineteen year-old son, who had died not long before in Iraq. Suarez spoke first in English and then in Spanish, as he does frequently around the country, and your heart could hardly beat for the sadness.
 Maybe in Oaxaca children are still hearing stories that the elders tell, but these kids in Salinas are being raised by television sets: they are latchkey kids. Their parents work for the most part in the fields and in wealthy homes. If you are mesmerized by television stupidity, and don’t get to hear or read stories about your world, you can be fooled into thinking that the world isn’t miraculous—and it is.
 The media attention brought in enough money, partly as a result of that day, to keep the libraries open for a whole year. You might not call this a miracle, exactly, but if you had been at the emergency read-in, you would see that it was at least the beginning of one.
A bunch of normally self-obsessed artist types came together to say to the people of Salinas: We care about your children, your stories, and your freedom. Something has gone so wrong in this country that needs to be fixed, and we care about that. Reading and books are medicine. Stories are written and told by and for people who have been broken, but who have risen up, or will rise, if attention is paid to them. Those people are you and us. Stories and truth are splints for the soul, and that makes today a sacred gathering. Now we were all saying: Pass it on.
[Pictured] John Steinbeck Library, Salinas, California, 2009

HAPPY BIRTHDAY ANNE LAMOTT!

Anne Lamott is an acclaimed novelist and non-fiction writer, as well as a passionate political activist, public speaker, and writing teacher. But, it’s her tireless support of public libraries that we would like to spotlight and celebrate today. In that spirit, we are proud to present Anne’s moving contribution to our just released book The Public Library: A Photographic Essay.

Steinbeck Country

In Salinas, word went out. This is how many tribal stories begin: word goes out to the people of a community that there is a great danger or that a wrong is being committed. This is how I first found out that the governor planned to close the public libraries in Salinas, making it the largest city in the United States to lose its libraries because of budget cuts.

Without getting into any mudslinging about whether or not our leaders are clueless, bullying, nonreading numbskulls,let me just say that when word went out that the three libraries—the John Steinbeck, the Cesar Chavez, and El Gabilan—were scheduled for closing, a whole lot of people rose up as one to say, This does not work for us. Salinas is one of the poorest communities in the state of California, in one of the richest counties in the country. The city and the surrounding area serve as the setting for so many of Steinbeck’s great novels. Think farmworkers, fields of artichokes and garlic, faded stucco houses stained with dirt, tracts of ticky-tacky housing, James Dean’s face in East of Eden, strawberry fields, and old gas stations.

Now think about closing the libraries there, closing the buildings that hold the town’s books, all those stories about people and wisdom and justice and life and silliness and laborers bending low to pick the strawberries. You’d have to be crazy to bring such obvious karmic repercussions down on yourself. So in early April, a group of writers and actors fought back, showing up in Salinas for a twenty-four-hour “emergency read-in.”

New trailer for The Big Picture by AMC president Josh Sapan, one of our favorite recent books.

Sapan’s book, containing nearly 100 panoramic images, reveals how these “strange and compelling” photos blur the line between fact and fiction—and why, in the early 20th century, Americans couldn’t get enough of them.

Happy New Year from Princeton Architectural Press!
From Instant: The Story of Polaroid.

Happy New Year from Princeton Architectural Press!

From Instant: The Story of Polaroid.

Focus on Photobooks Seminar with Mary Virginia Swanson
International House Hotel Conference Facility, New Orleans
Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013, 9am – 4pm
Registration fee: $50 in advance / $60 at door

Multi-artist Booksigning
Contemporary Arts Center
Sunday, December 15, 4pm – 5pm
Mary Virginia Swanson will be signing Publish Your Photography Book

The revised and updated edition of Publish Your Photography Book by Mary Virginia Swanson and Darius D. Himes will be available March 2014.

American Newspaper Publishers Association
Location unknown, ca. 1908

"In 1775 there were thirty-one newspapers being published in the thirteen colonies; sixty years later, the number was twelve hundred. By the beginning of the twentieth century, the world of print resembled today’s online news landscape in its sheer breadth, variety, and diversity of voices, including the now-iconic “yellow journalists” and the “muckrakers” who exposed society’s ills." —Arianna Huffington

From The Big Picture: America in Panorama, by Josh Sapan