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landscape
(30 posts)

Fall has arrived in Brooklyn! From Prospect Park: Olmsted & Vaux’s Brooklyn Masterpiece. Photography by Elizabeth Keegan Colley. Available now from PAPress.

Adjacent to the Pacific Ocean, the freshwater wetland islands of Orongo Station in New Zealand feature a mix of native hydric trees, shrubs, and marginal wetland plants and serve as a safe habitat for flightless birds during nesting season.

From Nelson Byrd Woltz: Garden, Park, Community, Farm.

A range of amazing projects from the book Tree Gardens:

top: A birch “forest” surrounds a shallow pool at the Novartis Headquarters in Basel, Switzerland.

middle: The approach to the Gateway Arch in winter, illustrated by landscape architect Daniel Urban Kiley. Kiley began work on the Gateway Memorial Park plan with Eero Saarinen in 1947, but a lack of funding and the Korean War interrupted his involvement until 1957.

bottom: An allée of aging horsechestnuts forms the “wooded circle” around the city of Lucca, Italy. The plantings visible today are the work of architect Lorenzo Nottolini, who was commissioned to transform the walls from military barriers (first completed in 1265) to public promenades by Maria Luisa, Bourbon Duchess of Lucca, in 1818.

Available here from PAPress.

The Flight 93 National Memorial in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, designed by Paul Murdoch Architects in collaboration with landscape designers Nelson Byrd Woltz. Inscribed on a white marble site wall that traces the flight path are the names of each of the forty passengers and crew members who lost their lives here on September 11, 2001.

From Nelson Byrd Woltz: Garden, Park, Community, Farm.

The Grand Prospect at Versailles extends for miles, illustrating the synthesis of garden and landscape, geometry and forestry. Though Versailles was first planted in 1661, ongoing management has been key to its flourishing in the centuries since. The young trees forming the Allée du Tapis Vert in the Petit Parc (at the center of this view) were planted in 1994 to re-establish the downward gradation.
From Tree Gardens: Architecture and the Forest, available here from PAPress.

The Grand Prospect at Versailles extends for miles, illustrating the synthesis of garden and landscape, geometry and forestry. Though Versailles was first planted in 1661, ongoing management has been key to its flourishing in the centuries since. The young trees forming the Allée du Tapis Vert in the Petit Parc (at the center of this view) were planted in 1994 to re-establish the downward gradation.

From Tree Gardens: Architecture and the Forest, available here from PAPress.

The Meadowport Arch opens into the Long Meadow. The interior vaults of this arch were brick-lined with an overlay of tongue-and-groove black walnut and yellow pine in alternating strips to prevent moisture from dripping onto pedestrians.
From Prospect Park: Olmsted & Vaux’s Brooklyn Masterpiece. Get it now from PAPress.

The Meadowport Arch opens into the Long Meadow. The interior vaults of this arch were brick-lined with an overlay of tongue-and-groove black walnut and yellow pine in alternating strips to prevent moisture from dripping onto pedestrians.

From Prospect Park: Olmsted & Vaux’s Brooklyn MasterpieceGet it now from PAPress.

In the heart of Brooklyn, a thick, green oasis.
From Prospect Park: Olmsted & Vaux’s Brooklyn Masterpiece, full of lush photography and rich history.

In the heart of Brooklyn, a thick, green oasis.

From Prospect Park: Olmsted & Vaux’s Brooklyn Masterpiece, full of lush photography and rich history.

On the low, flat plains of the north shore of Long Island, an early twentieth-century French Norman–style manor house sits on one of the few remaining intact estates of the Gilded Age, now transformed into a modern botanic garden. Pictured here is the cherry allée, from opposite seasonal perspectives.

From Nelson Byrd Woltz: Garden, Park, Community, Farm, available from PAPress here.

An American elm shows its exquisite design through the seasons on the Long Meadow.

From Prospect Park: Olmsted & Vaux’s Brooklyn Masterpiece, available now from PAPress.

Its designers called it their crowning achievement. Brooklyn borough president Marty Markowitz calls it an “urban emerald.” We recently published a new book on the beloved gem: Prospect Park: Olmsted & Vaux’s Brooklyn Masterpiece.

And New York Mag said the book is “destined to become the Brooklyn house gift of the year.” Get yours here.

As Adrian Benepe, the former city parks commissioner, writes in his introduction, this “rambunctious, bulging diamond” is Brooklyn’s heart and magnet. In many respects, it is more impressive than Central Park, its older sibling. —The New York Times

Find this aerial view and many other breathtaking vantage points in Prospect Park: Olmsted & Vaux’s Brooklyn Masterpiece.

20,000 trees were planted in the transformation of a former airport into a park that is now the centerpiece of a mixed-use development. Behold Riemer Park in Munich, Germany, designed by Gilles Vexlard and Laurence Vacherot of Latitude Nord in Paris.
From Tree Gardens: Architecture and the Forest, available here from PAPress.

20,000 trees were planted in the transformation of a former airport into a park that is now the centerpiece of a mixed-use development. Behold Riemer Park in Munich, Germany, designed by Gilles Vexlard and Laurence Vacherot of Latitude Nord in Paris.

From Tree Gardens: Architecture and the Forest, available here from PAPress.

Virginia creeper grows across the facade of the pool pavilion, allowing it to merge with the surrounding gardens at Seven Ponds, in Albemarle County, Virginia.
From Nelson Byrd Woltz: Garden, Park, Community, Farm.

Virginia creeper grows across the facade of the pool pavilion, allowing it to merge with the surrounding gardens at Seven Ponds, in Albemarle County, Virginia.

From Nelson Byrd Woltz: Garden, Park, Community, Farm.

View of Carl Theodor Sørensen’s Musical Garden in Herning, Denmark, from within a large oval hornbeam hedge.
From Tree Gardens: Architecture and the Forest.

View of Carl Theodor Sørensen’s Musical Garden in Herning, Denmark, from within a large oval hornbeam hedge.

From Tree Gardens: Architecture and the Forest.

plusarchitekt:

Drawings from James Corner and Alex Maclean’s Taking Measures Across the American Landscape

Corner’s Recovering Landscape and Maclean’s Up on the Roof are both available from Princeton Architectural Press.