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From San Francisco, Portrait of a City 1940–1960 — where master photographer Fred Lyon captures a noirish vision of the iconic landscapes and one-of-a-kind personalities that transformed the city by the bay into a legend.

The Selfies of the Early 20th Century

"The view that the panorama provides is at once fact and fiction: you can’t possibly see that much at once, but look! There we are, every one of us, recorded for posterity. We were there, together."
TheAtlantic.com

"The new panoramic camera was a perfect complement to other early-twentieth-century interests: voluntary associations and advocacy groups; professional organizations; urban life; large-scale public spectacles." 
Slate.com

"In one of the book’s weirder vignettes, Oklahoma field hands pose, leaning on pitchforks, while ominous steam-powered harvesting machinery belches smoke behind them."
New York Times

"There is a wild sense of possibility and optimism that is conveyed in these photographs.”
Boston.com

The Big Picture is available now!

American Newspaper Publishers Association
Location unknown, ca. 1908

"In 1775 there were thirty-one newspapers being published in the thirteen colonies; sixty years later, the number was twelve hundred. By the beginning of the twentieth century, the world of print resembled today’s online news landscape in its sheer breadth, variety, and diversity of voices, including the now-iconic “yellow journalists” and the “muckrakers” who exposed society’s ills." —Arianna Huffington

From The Big Picture: America in Panorama, by Josh Sapan

708 S. Barrington Ave. [The Dolphin] 1323 Bronson 818 Doheny Dr. 4489 Murietta Ave. 5947 Carlton Way 3919 N. Rosemead Blvd. 6565 Fountain Ave. 10433 Wilshire Blvd. 1555 Artesia Blvd.

wandrlust:

Some Los Angeles Apartments, 1965 — Ed Ruscha

We’re big fans of Ruscha—check out Ed reminiscing about his sign painting days in the foreword to Sign Painters.

From Balthazar Korab: Architect of Photography by John Comazzi.

From Balthazar Korab: Architect of Photography by John Comazzi.

View of Carl Theodor Sørensen’s Musical Garden in Herning, Denmark, from within a large oval hornbeam hedge.
From Tree Gardens: Architecture and the Forest.

View of Carl Theodor Sørensen’s Musical Garden in Herning, Denmark, from within a large oval hornbeam hedge.

From Tree Gardens: Architecture and the Forest.

Flight patterns of Starlings by photographer Richard Barnes, from Animal Logic, published in 2009 by PAPress.

Coleman House, 1956, San Francisco, CA
From The Houses of William Wurster: Frames for Living

More photographs by Balthazar Korab (1926–2013): Toronto Dominion Center (Mies van der Rohe) and the Great Lakes Regional Headquarters of the Reynolds Metals Company, Southfield, Michigan (Minoru Yamasaki).

From Balthazar Korab: Architect of Photography

Esteemed architectural photographer Balthazar Korab died Tuesday, he was 86. More posts on Korab here and here.

From Balthazar Korab: Architect of Photography by John Comazzi.

BEE by Rose-Lynn Fisher made Discover Magazine’s Best Science Art Books of 2012: “The images in BEE are the kind of machine-made line work Durer himself would’ve envied, infusing tiny creatures and surfaces with the depth, insight and majesty they deserve.”

Interior view from the mezzanine level at night, 1964 Night view of main entry, 1962

Eero Saarinen, TWA Flight Center, New York Idlewild Airport
New York, 1956–62
Photographs by Balthazar Korab

“This is my classic image of the project that reveals the complexity of the Saarinen approach to a four-dimensional experience in this space.”  

The Canoas House, Rio de Janeiro (1953) The Canoas House, Rio de Janeiro (1953) Ministry of Education and Health, Rio de Janeiro (1937–43) Hotel in Diamantina, Minas Gerais (1951) Obra do Berço (Cradle Work), Rio de Janeiro (1937) Ibirapuera Park, São Paulo (1951–55)

Buildings by the Brazilian architect Oscar Niemeyer (1907–2012)

From When Brazil Was Modern by Lauro Cavalcanti