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Stills from the book: Hollywood Frame by Frame: The Unseen Silver Screen in Contact Sheets, 1951–1997, by Karina Longworth.

In the pre-digital era, contact sheets offered a quick, visual summary of a photo shoot, and photographers, editors, and even subjects would make marks directly on the printed contact sheet pages to signify which images should be printed (and which absolutely shouldn’t), how they should be cropped, and whether or not more shooting was needed. Once a frame of film was exposed, it couldn’t be deleted, so contact sheets always include “mistakes”—moments which the photographer, or the subject, may not want anyone to see. Many of these contact sheets tell stories about how star personas are invented, while also exposing aspects of the individual celebrities’ personalities which the entire industry of celebrity myth-making usually tries to squeeze out. 

Breakfast at Tiffany’s (Paramount/The Kobal Collection/Howell Conant)
Raging Bull (Christine Loss)

The Chef Says Panel Discussion

October 1, 6pm-8pm
New York Public Library, South Court Auditorium
Free and open to the public

Join us for a discussion of chef life—real and imagined—with panelists Nach Waxman and Matt Sartwell (authors of The Chef Says and owners of Kitchen Arts & Letters Bookstore), Daniel Boulud (DANIEL), Amanda Cohen (Dirt Candy), Gabrielle Hamilton (Prune), and Lisa Mamounas (Culinary Insiders).

Doors open at 5:30. Click here for directions and more details.

Type Nite took place on the MICA campus in Baltimore on Sept. 22. We celebrated the release of Type on Screen by Ellen Lupton and Abbott Miller: Design and Content by Abbott Miller.

graphandcompass:

(via “A chart showing the percentage of excellence in the physical properties of books published since 1910″ | Retronaut)

W. A. Dwiggins

graphandcompass:

(via “A chart showing the percentage of excellence in the physical properties of books published since 1910″ | Retronaut)

W. A. Dwiggins

Emily Spivack will be signing copies of her new book at the NY Art Book Fair at MoMA/PS1 this Saturday.
PAPress table U02, 2nd fl. Come by!

Emily Spivack will be signing copies of her new book at the NY Art Book Fair at MoMA/PS1 this Saturday.

PAPress table U02, 2nd fl. Come by!

Infographic Designers’ Sketchbooks
Coming in October from Princeton Architectural Press!

Images: 1) Sketch for an infographic on the shopping habits of American men © Laura Cattaneo, 2012. 2) An infographic illustrating the adulteration of olive oil © Nicholas Blachman, 2013. 3) An infographic of the Memo Process app for iPad (in development)
 © Caroline Oh + Young Sang Cho. 4) A series of illustrations and games for The Guardian about trees, recycling and saving energy © Serge Seidlitz, 2012.

Ellen Lupton: Scalable App Icons

As a follow-up to the bestselling Thinking with Type, Ellen Lupton has edited a new primer on typography for the digital age. Type on Screen presents the classic typographic concepts you may already know in the context of printed pages, updated for use on screen-based applications like electronic publications and websites, as well as video and mobile devices. This post excerpts a section on creating scalable app icons for PCs and mobile devices.

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A desktop icon for Mac OS may be viewed as small as 16×16px in a sidebar or as large as 1024×1024px in Apple’s flip-through “cover flow” interface. Creating scalable application icons thus demands attention to pixel-perfect detail. Doing it well requires making at least six different versions of the same icon for various display purposes. A Mac OS icon file (ICNS) consists of multiple image files at different sizes, each simplified according to its scale, with more detail possible at larger sizes. The ICNS format supports the following sizes: 16×16, 32×32, 48×48, 128×128, 256×256, 512×512, and 1024×1024px. Begin drawing the icon at the largest size and work your way down to the smaller sizes, redrawing elements as needed. For the sidebar icon, you can eliminate the reference to a folder, as seen in the tiny 16px camera icon below.

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Right  Draw each size individually, simplifying and adjusting as needed for legibility.

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Wrong  Simply scaling an icon down creates illegible forms that lack detail and refinement.

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Wrong  Likewise, scaling an icon up from the smallest size yields odd-looking icons at larger sizes.

———

Apple’s iOS requires icons in a multitude of sizes for various devices and presentation situations:

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512 × 512 px  iTunes artwork

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114 × 114 px  Home screen icon for iPhone Retina Display

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72 × 72 px  Home screen icon for iPad

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58 × 58 px  Spotlight and settings icon for iPhone Retina Display

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57 × 57 px  App store and home screen icon for iPhone / iPad Touch

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50 × 50 px  iPad Spotlight search results

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29 × 29 px  Settings icon in iPad and iPhone, and spotlight icon on iPhone

———

Find more like this in Type on Screen, available now from Princeton Architectural Press.

NY Art Book Fair | Sept 26–28 | PS1 MoMA
Visit the PAPress table (U-02) this weekend!

NY Art Book Fair | Sept 26–28 | PS1 MoMA

Visit the PAPress table (U-02) this weekend!

explore-blog:

In Emily Spivack’s altogether fantastic storytelling project Worn Stories, Piper Kerman writes about the vintage suit she wore at her final court appearance and sentencing, a key moment in her memoir-turned-TV-hit Orange Is the New Black:

As your case wends through the system, you barely speak in court; the prosecutor and defense attorney do most of the talking. Unlike 80 percent of criminal defendants, I could afford to hire a lawyer, and I was lucky that he was a very good and experienced one. He had advocated long and hard with the prosecutor on my behalf, and then the day came where his work and my case would be decided by the judge, a Reagan appointee to the federal bench.Most criminal defendants wear whatever they are given by their attorney or family to their sentencing ; a lot of people are too poor to afford bail, and so they have been wearing jailhouse orange for many months before ever getting their day in court. I was much more fortunate; when I flew to Chicago to be sentenced to prison, I had three choices of court attire in my suitcase. A cadet-blue pantsuit, a very severe navy coatdress, and a wild card I had packed at the last minute: a vintage fifties pencil-skirt suit I had bought on eBay, in a coffee and cream tweed with a subtle sky blue check. It looked like something a Hitchcock heroine would have worn.“That’s the one,” said my lawyer, pointing to the skirt suit. “We want the judge to be reminded of his own daughter or niece or neighbor when he looks at you.”For someone standing for judgment, the importance of being seen as a complete human being, someone who is more than just the contents of the file folders that rest on the bench in front of His or Her Honor, cannot be overstated.

More fantastic wearable memoirs curated by Spivack here.

explore-blog:

In Emily Spivack’s altogether fantastic storytelling project Worn Stories, Piper Kerman writes about the vintage suit she wore at her final court appearance and sentencing, a key moment in her memoir-turned-TV-hit Orange Is the New Black:

As your case wends through the system, you barely speak in court; the prosecutor and defense attorney do most of the talking. Unlike 80 percent of criminal defendants, I could afford to hire a lawyer, and I was lucky that he was a very good and experienced one. He had advocated long and hard with the prosecutor on my behalf, and then the day came where his work and my case would be decided by the judge, a Reagan appointee to the federal bench.

Most criminal defendants wear whatever they are given by their attorney or family to their sentencing ; a lot of people are too poor to afford bail, and so they have been wearing jailhouse orange for many months before ever getting their day in court. I was much more fortunate; when I flew to Chicago to be sentenced to prison, I had three choices of court attire in my suitcase. A cadet-blue pantsuit, a very severe navy coatdress, and a wild card I had packed at the last minute: a vintage fifties pencil-skirt suit I had bought on eBay, in a coffee and cream tweed with a subtle sky blue check. It looked like something a Hitchcock heroine would have worn.

“That’s the one,” said my lawyer, pointing to the skirt suit. “We want the judge to be reminded of his own daughter or niece or neighbor when he looks at you.”

For someone standing for judgment, the importance of being seen as a complete human being, someone who is more than just the contents of the file folders that rest on the bench in front of His or Her Honor, cannot be overstated.

More fantastic wearable memoirs curated by Spivack here.

Keep Fresh, Stay Rad

New from our Friends of Type – a super cool box of 100 typographically fabulous postcards! Includes nice little Q&A booklet with the designers.

Creatures of the night!

Our new book Nocturne is garnering some praise – hit these links to see more: Slate, New Scientist, DiscoverMagazine.com, NBC News.com, FastCompany.com, Parade.com, Publishers Weekly.

From top to bottom:
Serval, Spiny Mouse, Indian Flying Fox, Tarantula, River Otter

Get the book here!

Louise Fili in Conversation with Debbie Millman
Sept. 17, 6-8pm
New York Public Library, South Court Auditorium
Free and open to the public

Louise Fili will present on her favorite Italian signs, the inspiration for her own design style. Afterward, she will be interviewed by Design Matters’ Debbie Millman, take questions from the audience, and autograph copies of Grafica della Strada: The Signs of Italy

Louise Fili exhibiton at the ADC

Elegantissima: The Exhibit opened this Wednesday, September 10th at the Art Directors Club. The show was designed by Kevin O’Callaghan and displays four decades of Louise Fili’s work, all set within beautifully crafted and themed room environments. 

Be sure to see the exhibit before it ends on September 19th (the ADC is located at 106 West 29th Street, NYC) and discover more of Louise’s fine work in Elegantissima: The Design and Typography of Louise Fili (2012). 

Raffle: ‘Type on Screen’ by Ellen Lupton and ‘Abbott Miller: Design and Content’

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Enter your email address to win a copy of Type on Screen by Ellen Lupton and Abbott Miller: Design and Content for your school library (or a school library of your choice), plus a $100 Princeton Architectural Press gift certificate for yourself.

Type Nite (w/ Ellen Lupton & Abbott Miller)
Sept. 22, 6:30pm
MICA, Brown Center, Falvey Hall
Baltimore

MFA in Graphic Design faculty members Ellen Lupton, Abbott Miller, and type designer Tal Leming, along with special guests, will showcase new typefaces under development; explore type at work on page, on screen, and the built environment; and celebrate the release of Lupton’s new book, Type on Screen, and Miller’s new book, Abbott Miller: Design and Content. On-site and on-line book signings will follow the program.

If you are not in Baltimore: Pre-order your book(s) at the MICA Bookstore website and receive 20% off. You will have the opportunity to fill out how you would like your book(s) inscribed. The author(s) will sign your book(s) and the store will mail them to you. Include your Twitter handle and we’ll tweet a photo of the author(s) signing your book(s)! Following the autographing session with attendees, the authors will take questions from remote fans via Twitter. Use the Twitter hash-tag #TypeNite when you tweet your question, and don’t forget to follow #TypeNite on Twitter to experience the whole event!