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A-Frame Notecards and Postcards! 

A 12-card set culled from the golden, groovy age of midcentury A-frame ski lodges, country homes, and vacation getaways. The package itself folds out to become its own mini A-frame dwelling, perfect for desktop (or lakeside) display. Available here.

The first book about Eliel and Eero Saarinen’s residential work, Saarinen Houses presents seventeen remarkable houses built over a span of six decades, in Finland and the United States. From Eliel’s early twentieth-century Villa Pulkanranta, an eclectic mix of local Finnish design traditions and international influences, to Eero’s Miller House, one of the most significant examples of modern domestic architecture in the United States, each project features original drawings and archival photos, as well as new interior and exterior shots.

Nocturne Book Launch!
Join photographer and author Traer Scott for the book launch for Nocturne. She’ll be signing books and some of the night dwelling animals that are featured in the book will be on hand for kids to meet and learn about.
Books on the SquareSaturday, October 11th, from 2 to 4 p.m.Providence, Rhode Island

Nocturne Book Launch!

Join photographer and author Traer Scott for the book launch for Nocturne. She’ll be signing books and some of the night dwelling animals that are featured in the book will be on hand for kids to meet and learn about.

Books on the Square
Saturday, October 11th, from 2 to 4 p.m.
Providence, Rhode Island

On October 1, 2014, chefs Daniel Boulud, Amanda Cohen, and Gabrielle Hamilton joined The Chef Says editors Matt Sartwell and Nach Waxman, and Culinary Insiders’ Lisa Mamounas (not pictured) in a lively discussion about the real lives of chefs.
You can stream or download the audio of The Chef Says event at New York Public Library as a podcast on NYPL.org!

On October 1, 2014, chefs Daniel Boulud, Amanda Cohen, and Gabrielle Hamilton joined The Chef Says editors Matt Sartwell and Nach Waxman, and Culinary Insiders’ Lisa Mamounas (not pictured) in a lively discussion about the real lives of chefs.

You can stream or download the audio of The Chef Says event at New York Public Library as a podcast on NYPL.org!

From San Francisco, Portrait of a City 1940–1960 — where master photographer Fred Lyon captures a noirish vision of the iconic landscapes and one-of-a-kind personalities that transformed the city by the bay into a legend.

Elliot + Elliot Architecture
'House on a Hill' from Houses of Maine.

Two special Worn Stories events!

• • •

Tuesday, October 7, New York City
The Strand Bookstore at Club Monaco Presents
You’re invited to a special book event and panel discussion in New York with Emily Spivack to celebrate her new book, Worn Stories. Emily Spivack will be joined by three of the book’s contributors:

Dapper Dan
Fashion designer and pioneer of hip-hop style
Kenneth Goldsmith
Author, poet, and artist
Jenna Wortham
Cultural critic and New York Times technology reporter

7pm, Tuesday, October 7th
Men’s Shop at Club Monaco, Lower Level
160 Fifth Avenue at 21st Street
New York City
RSVP to Courtney.Denton@ClubMonaco.com

• • •

Thursday, October 9, Philadelphia
All Ages Productions in conjunction with DesignPhiladephia present the Philadelphia launch party for Emily Spivack’s book of sartorial memoirs, Worn Stories.

Join us for the book’s release with drinks, noshes, and readings from Emily Spivack and Worn Stories contributors Harvey (Double Dare announcer) and Brian Dwyer (Pizza Brain co-owner).

6:30–9:30pm, Thursday, October 9th
All Ages Productions
1315 Walnut Street, Suite 1530
Philadelphia, PA
RSVP to rsvp@wornstories.com

• • •

The book will also be available for signing and purchase at both events.

Following up the book Woodcut and our box of Woodcut Notecards, comes Woodcut Notebooks. Artist Bryan Nash Gill (1961–2013) combed the woods surrounding his Connecticut studio to find the fallen trees captured in his striking woodcut prints. Each of the prints featured on these colorful notebooks tells a story of forest life through a gnarled and nuanced pattern of arboreal rings. For these notebooks, the rings are printed at a one-to-one scale with the color derived from Bryan’s original woodblock print. Images courtesy of Terrain.

Stills from the book: Hollywood Frame by Frame: The Unseen Silver Screen in Contact Sheets, 1951–1997, by Karina Longworth.

In the pre-digital era, contact sheets offered a quick, visual summary of a photo shoot, and photographers, editors, and even subjects would make marks directly on the printed contact sheet pages to signify which images should be printed (and which absolutely shouldn’t), how they should be cropped, and whether or not more shooting was needed. Once a frame of film was exposed, it couldn’t be deleted, so contact sheets always include “mistakes”—moments which the photographer, or the subject, may not want anyone to see. Many of these contact sheets tell stories about how star personas are invented, while also exposing aspects of the individual celebrities’ personalities which the entire industry of celebrity myth-making usually tries to squeeze out. 

Breakfast at Tiffany’s (Paramount/The Kobal Collection/Howell Conant)
Raging Bull (Christine Loss)

The Chef Says Panel Discussion

October 1, 6pm-8pm
New York Public Library, South Court Auditorium
Free and open to the public

Join us for a discussion of chef life—real and imagined—with panelists Nach Waxman and Matt Sartwell (authors of The Chef Says and owners of Kitchen Arts & Letters Bookstore), Daniel Boulud (DANIEL), Amanda Cohen (Dirt Candy), Gabrielle Hamilton (Prune), and Lisa Mamounas (Culinary Insiders).

Doors open at 5:30. Click here for directions and more details.

Type Nite took place on the MICA campus in Baltimore on Sept. 22. We celebrated the release of Type on Screen by Ellen Lupton and Abbott Miller: Design and Content by Abbott Miller.

graphandcompass:

(via “A chart showing the percentage of excellence in the physical properties of books published since 1910″ | Retronaut)

W. A. Dwiggins

graphandcompass:

(via “A chart showing the percentage of excellence in the physical properties of books published since 1910″ | Retronaut)

W. A. Dwiggins

Infographic Designers’ Sketchbooks
Coming in October from Princeton Architectural Press!

Images: 1) Sketch for an infographic on the shopping habits of American men © Laura Cattaneo, 2012. 2) An infographic illustrating the adulteration of olive oil © Nicholas Blachman, 2013. 3) An infographic of the Memo Process app for iPad (in development)
 © Caroline Oh + Young Sang Cho. 4) A series of illustrations and games for The Guardian about trees, recycling and saving energy © Serge Seidlitz, 2012.

Ellen Lupton: Scalable App Icons

As a follow-up to the bestselling Thinking with Type, Ellen Lupton has edited a new primer on typography for the digital age. Type on Screen presents the classic typographic concepts you may already know in the context of printed pages, updated for use on screen-based applications like electronic publications and websites, as well as video and mobile devices. This post excerpts a section on creating scalable app icons for PCs and mobile devices.

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A desktop icon for Mac OS may be viewed as small as 16×16px in a sidebar or as large as 1024×1024px in Apple’s flip-through “cover flow” interface. Creating scalable application icons thus demands attention to pixel-perfect detail. Doing it well requires making at least six different versions of the same icon for various display purposes. A Mac OS icon file (ICNS) consists of multiple image files at different sizes, each simplified according to its scale, with more detail possible at larger sizes. The ICNS format supports the following sizes: 16×16, 32×32, 48×48, 128×128, 256×256, 512×512, and 1024×1024px. Begin drawing the icon at the largest size and work your way down to the smaller sizes, redrawing elements as needed. For the sidebar icon, you can eliminate the reference to a folder, as seen in the tiny 16px camera icon below.

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Right  Draw each size individually, simplifying and adjusting as needed for legibility.

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Wrong  Simply scaling an icon down creates illegible forms that lack detail and refinement.

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Wrong  Likewise, scaling an icon up from the smallest size yields odd-looking icons at larger sizes.

———

Apple’s iOS requires icons in a multitude of sizes for various devices and presentation situations:

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512 × 512 px  iTunes artwork

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114 × 114 px  Home screen icon for iPhone Retina Display

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72 × 72 px  Home screen icon for iPad

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58 × 58 px  Spotlight and settings icon for iPhone Retina Display

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57 × 57 px  App store and home screen icon for iPhone / iPad Touch

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50 × 50 px  iPad Spotlight search results

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29 × 29 px  Settings icon in iPad and iPhone, and spotlight icon on iPhone

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Find more like this in Type on Screen, available now from Princeton Architectural Press.

NY Art Book Fair | Sept 26–28 | PS1 MoMA
Visit the PAPress table (U-02) this weekend!

NY Art Book Fair | Sept 26–28 | PS1 MoMA

Visit the PAPress table (U-02) this weekend!